Biscay. / (ˈbɪskeɪ, -kɪ) / noun. of Biscay a large bay of between W and N : notorious for storms. Slang. The Bay of Biscay, which is bounded by the west coast of France and the north coast of Spain, covers an of 86,000 sq miles. It's known for its rough seas and violent storms and much of this is thanks to its exposure to the . It is along the western coast of France from Brest south to the Spanish border, and the northern coast of Spain west to Cape Ortegal. It is named in English after the province of Biscay, in the Spanish Basque Country. It lies along the western coast of France from Point Penmarc'h to the Spanish border, and the northern coast of Spain west to Cape Ortegal. The south area of the Bay of Biscay that washes over the northern coast of Spain is known locally as the Cantabrian . Located in the , a gulf of the northeast Atlantic Ocean is called the Bay of Biscay. It is located in the northern coast of Spain and the western coast of France and is named after the Spanish province of Biscay. The Bay of Biscay (/ˈbɪskeɪ, -ki/), known in Spain as the Gulf of Biscay (Spanish: Golfo de Vizcaya, Basque: Bizkaiko Golkoa), and in France and some border regions as the Gulf of Gascony (French: Golfe de Gascogne, Occitan: Golf de Gasconha, Breton: Pleg-mor Gwaskogn), is a gulf of the northeast Atlantic Ocean located south of the Celtic Sea. It lies along the western coast of France from Point Penmarc'h to the Spanish border, and the northern coast of Spain west to Cape Ortegal. The south area of the Bay of Biscay that washes over the northern coast of Spain is known locally as the Cantabrian Sea. The average depth is 1,744 m (5,722 ft) and the greatest depth is 4,735 m (15,535 ft). The International Hydrographic Organization defines the limits of the Bay of Biscay as “a line joining Cap Ortegal (43°46′N 7°52′W) to Penmarch Point (47°48′N 4°22′W)”. The southernmost portion is the Cantabrian Sea. In late spring and early summer a large fog triangle fills the southwestern half of the bay, covering just a few kilometres inland. As winter begins, weather becomes severe. Depressions enter from the west very frequently and they either bounce north to the British Isles or they enter the Ebro Valley, dry out, and are finally reborn in the form of powerful thunderstorms as they reach the Sea. These depressions cause severe weather at sea and bring light though very constant rain to its shores (known as orballo, sirimiri, morrina, orbayu, orpin or calabobos). Sometimes powerful windstorms form if the pressure falls rapidly (Galernas), traveling along the Gulf Stream at great speed, resembling a hurricane and finally crashing in this bay with their maximum power, such as the Klaus storm. The Gulf Stream enters the bay following the 's border anti-clockwise (the Rennell Current), keeping…

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