Maritime Law & Security in Antarctica

Antarctica is a continent of immense environmental, economic, political, and scientific importance. It is home to many species of animals and plants and also contains vast natural resources. As a result, it has been subject to a variety of international agreements and laws designed to protect the environment, promote peace and security, and facilitate research and economic opportunities. In particular, maritime law and security are critical for the safe navigation of vessels in and out of the continent. This article provides an overview of the legal and security challenges presented by Antarctica’s maritime environment and the measures being taken to address these challenges.

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Exploring the Diverse Wildlife of Antarctica: A Comprehensive Insight

Exploring Antarctica’s Wildlife: A Comprehensive Insight

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Unveiling Australia’s Antarctic Adventure: Overcoming the Frozen Frontiers

Antarctica: A land shrouded in mystery, beckoning adventurers to conquer its frozen frontiers. Join us as we unveil Australia’s extraordinary Antarctic expedition, a daring quest to unravel the secrets of the icy continent. Brace yourselves for a mesmerizing tale of courage, curiosity, and triumph in one of the harshest environments on Earth.

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About Weddell Sea, facts and maps

Scientists have declared the waters of the Weddell Sea to be the clearest water of any sea on Earth. The clarity of the water is on…

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What Makes a Continent a Continent?

According to a 2017 paper published in the Geological Society of America’s journal, GSA Today, “The ‘Glossary of Geology’ defines a continent as ‘one of the Earth’s major landmasses, including both dry land and continental shelves.’ It is generally agreed that continents have all the following attributes: (1) high elevation relative to regions floored by oceanic crust; (2) a broad range of siliceous igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks; (3) thicker crust and lower seismic velocity structure than oceanic crustal regions; and (4) well-defined limits around a large enough area to be considered a continent rather than a microcontinent or continental fragment… To our knowledge, the last point — how ‘major’ a piece of continental crust has to be to be called a continent — is almost never discussed.”

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